You’ll Take A Bath

©© Copyright Mike Pennington and licensed for reuse under a Creative Commons Licence (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Just a quick update… and yes, I know it’s almost 11 at night, so you probably won’t see it!

I’m planning to work through the notes you’ve made on ‘You’ll Take A Bath’ tomorrow, and I’m also going to throw in some updated thoughts on ‘Old Woman (And she, being old…)’.

Don’t panic if you don’t know/aren’t sure about ‘Old Woman’, you should find plenty to talk about with the notes you get. I’m going to be approaching ‘You’ll Take A Bath’ as an example of textual analysis, so the stress and emphasis of the lesson will be much more technical in nature. Be ready to take lots of notes on techniques used by Crichton Smith.

Don’t forget that your main tasks with regards homework for the next three weeks are to:

  1. Read Little Brother, and
  2. Finish your discursive writing on beauty.

I’m hoping you’ll all pluck up enough courage to contribute to the blog, or even better, the wiki for LB during the October break. Let’s hope so!

Finally, I’m adding a wee overview of Textual Analysis that I found on the Hawick High School website. Some great advice and questions to consider as you read any poem or story or play… 😉

HIGHER ENGLISH     TEXTUAL ANALYSIS    –    SOME GUIDELINES

 Start from OBSERVATION of TECHNIQUES:

–       strong or unusual word choice

–       literary techniques (alliteration, onomatopoeia, simile, metaphor, contrast, paradox, etc)

–       structure and sentence structure (repetition, enjambment, minor sentences, interrupted sentences, verse structure, etc)

Look for PATTERNS and for CHANGES TO PATTERNS:

–       in words and phrases

–       techniques

–       sentence structures

–       ideas, points, details

–       verse structures

Start with the OBVIOUS meaning and identify such things as:

–       character

–       situation

–       place

–       event

Be aware of what the writer is asking YOU to bring to the text:

–       references to people, events from news, history, religion, etc

–       connection to shared feeling, etc

–       use of double meanings ( not just puns)

–       possible multiple interpretations

–       use of a central or recurring image which you are asked to respond to

Enjoy!

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